Welcoming Marcus Cordonnier

 

Starting Wednesday, July 19 2017, CHS Larsen Cooperative welcomes our new grain department manager, Marcus Cordonnier. Marcus brings with him 22 years of experience, managing country elevators and rail terminals.  He has worked for ADM and Bunge as well as being the Grain Manager of several co-op’s.

Growing up in western Ohio, Marcus was raised on a grain and beef farm. He milked cows for his uncle during his high school years and drove a milk truck on the weekends to help pay for college.  Marcus attended The Ohio State University and graduated in June 1994 with a degree in Agricultural Economics.  He later received his MBA from Ashland University in May 2004.

Marcus has a deep passion for the grain business and loves to manage the grain position.  In addition to trading grain, he has much experience with managing rail terminals, building relationships with end users, and helping customers market their grain.  He takes the harvest planning process seriously and has a lot of experience with operations and logistics, especially during harvest.  There is nothing more important to him than to keep all facilities open and ready for business during the harvest push.

Please feel free to stop by and introduce yourself to meet Marcus in person. He is very excited to start meeting the employees and customers of our co-op and to learn how we conduct business.  His door is always open and willing to work with any employee or customer.  He enjoys conversations about all possibilities in the grain markets.

Marcus will be relocating to the New London area, where he plans to find his new home. He enjoys fishing, watching football, and spending the summer months going to tractor pulls.  Marcus is an avid Buckeye fan and cannot wait until the Badgers play the Buckeyes this fall.  But don’t worry; he’s already a loyal Packer fan!

Please help me in welcoming Marcus to CHS Larsen Cooperative. With a sales territory that is so large I have decided to communicate these messages through this memo; however, group or in person meetings with me are available upon request. Also, I would like to thank everyone for handling this transition period well.

Thank you,

Todd Reif

General Manager

CHS Larsen Cooperative

CHS reports fiscal 2017 third-quarter results

Underlying business performance stable, one-time events cause quarterly loss

PAUL, MINN. (July 14, 2017) – CHS Inc., the nation’s leading farmer-owned cooperative and a global energy, grains and foods company, announced a net loss of $45.2 million for the third quarter of its 2017 fiscal year (three-month period ended May 31, 2017), compared to net income of $190.3 million for the same period one year ago. Consolidated revenues for the third quarter were $8.6 billion, compared to $7.8 billion for the third quarter of 2016, representing a 10 percent increase.

“Despite the economic challenges in agriculture and energy, several of our underlying businesses are having a solid year,” said CHS President and Chief Executive Officer Jay Debertin. “Unfortunately, we’ve experienced three negative one-time events this fiscal year that have resulted in charges leading to a loss in the third quarter and a significant earnings decline for the year to date. In response to these events, we are implementing measures to better identify risk management gaps in some of our processes and when necessary enhance our ability to effectively manage our risks.”

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5 Considerations for Effectively Applying Herbicides

applying herbicides

Soil Science

There are several factors to consider before and during herbicide spray application. Taking the appropriate steps to prepare for a successful application can save time, money and effort. While spray requirements may vary based on crop, location and herbicide formulation, there are steps that should be taken to ensure the best protection against weeds during the current crop season and to protect the effectiveness of the herbicide long term.

Mother Nature plays an important role in the success of herbicide application. In addition to the preventive and arbitrary actions necessary to increase herbicide effectiveness, working with natural conditions is extremely beneficial and mandatory since we do not control the weather or other natural factors. (more…)

Improving Plant Nutrition: Understanding Nutrient Effectiveness

Center Valley Facility ResponsibleAg Certified

ResponsibleAg Certification Group

CHS Larsen Cooperative’s Center Valley location was honored to receive their ResponsibleAg Certification. This certification recognizes the commitment this facility has made to the safety and security of employees, customers and community.

ResponsibleAg is the only program in the nation that provides a comprehensive assessment of retailers and wholesalers to achieve and maintain federal regulatory compliance. Certification requires a facility to meet stringent regulatory-based criteria, to implement industry leading safety and security measures, and to resolve the facility safety as their highest priority.

All of the Center Valley employees participated in the corrective actions necessary to meet the requirements for this certification. Most actions were safety related items, as well as, proper identification with labels, proper waste management and communication.

CHS Larsen Cooperative is proud to be a part of this voluntary program that is a proactive commitment to providing a safe, secure and complaint workplace for their employees, customers and neighbors.

“Having the ResponsibleAg Certification will help us show the community around us that this is a safe place for the neighborhood and employees,” said Andy VanDyck, CHS Larsen Co-op Operations Manager. “We want to ensure those living in our community feel safe knowing that our business is compliant.”

To learn more about the ResponsbileAg program check out their website www.responsibleag.org

Pictured above are the Center Valley employees that helped make this certification possible. Left to Right: Jeremy Hunt, Taylor Coy, Jeff Beresford, Dave Barth, Paul Tank, Andy “Dutch” VanDyck, John Andraschko, Clay Alexander, and Tom Rose. Not Pictured: Hailey Sorenson and Mary Kay Cleven.

 

Setting Your Fresh Cows Up for Success with Hydro-Lac®

Fresh Cow Hydro-Lac

Returning fresh cows to positive energy balance as fast as you can after calving is the end goal of any transition program.  We do this by feeding a well-balanced, consistent particle length pre-fresh ration to maximize dry matter intake.  At the same time, we provide a clean, comfortable, well-ventilated facility and try not to overcrowd this group.  They calve and we repeat these same principles in the fresh pen.

Then all the daily variables happen such as feeder deviation, forage quality changes, employees not performing as well as we would like, cold weather, hot weather, humidity, etc.  How do we give ourselves an advantage to overcome these obstacles?

One way many of our customers take the next step in bettering their transition program is adding Hydro-Lac in their pre-fresh and fresh cow programs all year round. In 2014, a field demonstration trial¹ was done on 17 Minnesota herds from January to July.  The trial results ultimately resulted in an increase of 979 lbs. of Fresh ME and a 6.6:1 return on investment.  When I joined Form-A-Feed last March, I wanted to conduct a study that proved Hydro-Lac increased fresh cow performance.

We asked a 450-cow dairy in central Minnesota to use 0.33 lbs. of Hydro-Lac in their fresh pen from the middle of July 2016 to middle of September 2016.  We changed nothing in the nutrition except for the addition of Hydro-Lac.  Fresh cows were in this pen for 14-30 days. The results we saw were incredible.

I compared all cows that calved in July-September 2015 to the cows that calved July-September 2016.  There was a 7 pound increase at week 4 in milk production over cows that calved in 2015.  Why is this significant?  A lactation data set based on 3.5 million cows published by the University of Wisconsin shows that a 1 lb. increase of week 4 milk will result in approximately 405 lbs. of milk over the entire lactation.  So, this means that the cows that calved in the summer of 2016 that were fed Hydro-Lac will have the potential to produce 2,837 lbs. of milk more than the cows that calved in the same time in 2015 without Hydro-Lac.²

All of this from 0.33 lbs. of Hydro-Lac during the fresh period?  When I sit back and think about this, it makes sense why it would work.  Hydro-Lac helps tissues preserve glucose and keeps fluids in the cells.  It has antioxidant immune support properties, and quick sources of energy for the cow to metabolize during this stressful time.  All this makes cows more hydrated, which will lead to an opportunity for higher dry matter intake and thus lead to quicker return to positive energy balance.

This small investment for 14-21 days can be worth over 2,800 lbs. of milk over their lactation.  What can you do outside of Hydro-Lac that you can get that big of a return?  I am a believer in it now and have seen incredible responses on dairies all year round.

For details or a report summary of this and other fresh cow studies involving Hydro-Lac, click on the whitepapers below (¹´²). Better yet, ask your CHS Larsen Cooperative Representative about their experiences with Hydro-Lac in transition programs all year round.

  ¹Kohls, et.al. 2014 HL#1501 

²Kinches, et.al. 2017 HL#1607 

Original Source: Form-A-Feed Written by: Tim Kinches, Technical Services Specialist

Making the Most of Your Hay

Hay BaleWith early season drought conditions spreading from the eastern half of Montana, across the Dakotas, and into northwest Minnesota, finding high quality pasture and range land has been a challenge. With limited grazing resources, many cattle producers have been forced to turn to hay or other harvested forage much earlier in the season than usual. With hay prices expected to climb due to the increased demand, it is more important than ever to get the most out of hay through minimizing harvest, storage, and feeding losses.

The time from cutting to baling is the number one factor which will influence harvest loss. Rapid drying is the key to minimize losses and maintain nutritive value. Mother nature has a mind of her own when it comes to providing ideal conditions for drying, but every effort should be made to select a cutting date which offers the lowest chance of precipitation or one which offers only a chance for precipitation closer to the cutting time (less dry matter loss if rain falls on wetter hay materials than dry). Mechanical conditioning can also be used to hasten the drying process by exposing more plant surface to moisture losses. If necessary, hay can also be baled at a higher moisture content than normal (18-22%) and treated with a preservative such as Crop Cure®.

You may not have control over the weather and its impacts on your hay crop, but you do have a choice in how your bales are packaged. Based upon cost alone, twine wrapping is the easy winner when compared to net wrapping. However, twine-wrapped bales can cost you dearly in operating speed (more wraps slows down bale production), handling losses (struggle to maintain shape, less uniform and instable), and storage losses (poor water shedding if stored outside) when compared to net-wrapped bales. When it comes to minimizing material and nutritive losses, net wrap is the clear winner. While it may pain many to spend a significant amount more (2-3x cost per bale) on a material which simply gets thrown away after use, return on investment economics win the argument. Assuming an added cost of 80 cents per bale for net wrap, reducing storage loss by as little as 1% will recoup your investment with current hay values.

Avoiding Loss

With the cost of harvesting and packaging already invested, it is essential to properly store hay to maximize its value. According to a study conducted at the University of Tennessee, storage losses can range from as little as 5% when stored in a hay barn to as much as 30% when stored uncovered. Storage losses when bales are stacked on pallets and tarped falls intermediate at 14%. Taking these additional measures to preserve your crop will certainly add cost, but the return is that much greater with higher hay costs. It will also allow for more effective stockpiling to ensure supply when drought conditions arise.

All your good work can be undone if your hay ends up as glorified bedding due to feeding losses. Feeding hay in small amounts (daily rather than weekly), using a hay feeder rather than feeding on the ground, and locating your feeding area in a well-drained area are all methods to reduce feeding loss. It is also best to first feed hay stored outside before hay stored inside. The longer hay is stored outside, the more prone it is to spoilage and cattle are much more likely to waste and refuse poor quality hay.

Using even the best management practices from cutting to feeding, you can still expect dry matter losses in the range of 15-20%, but these losses can easily run over 50% if corners are cut. Preserving and maximizing your feed resources is crucial for the financial wellbeing of your operation. Please contact your CHS Larsen Cooperative representative to discuss a comprehensive forage management program for your operation.

Original Source: Form-A-Feed Written by: Simon Kern, M.S., Form-A-Feed Business Manager

6 Tips for Minimizing Heat Stress on Your Dairy

Cooling Cattle

Minimizing heat stress is a goal of every dairyman. Tunnel or cross ventilated barns have given us a cow comfort standard that we can try to attain in many barns. There have been improvements in air movement and sprinkler systems in most dairies. But what else can we do?

 1. Feeding more digestible forages. Low quality forages stay in the rumen longer and produce more heat than high quality forages.

Target these mineral levels in summer:

Potassium                          >1.5%

Sodium                                 .4-.55%

Chloride                                <.35

DCAD                                   At least 300 meq/Kg

2. Lowering stocking density.  If possible, especially in pre- and post-fresh pens. This will help reduce metabolic disease incidence.

3. Provide shade. Cows under stress are light sensitive and bunch up in areas away from sunlight.  Shade cloth on outside walls or lowering the lower curtain can allow cows to spread out.

4. Feed multiples time a day. Feeding multiple times a day will keep fresh feed in front of cows and ensure adequate feed at night as cows will eat more in cooler temperatures.

5. Water. Waterers need to be cleaned more often in hot weather. Access to water immediately after milking is more important than ever.

6. Hydro-Lac. 

Hydro-Lac Provides Hydration and Energy Support During Periods of Stress.

It’s a palatable source of blended electrolytes, multiple energy sources, minerals, vitamins, and osmolytes. From this patented technology, Hydro-Lac provides the necessary nutrients to recover from the effects of heat stress, such as dehydration, and help restore animal health for better all around productivity.

Using Hydro-Lac can improve cow performance by helping reduce milk loss due to heat stress, promote more rapid production response post-calving, and encourage feed and water intake to overcome health challenges.

Field results have shown that cows fed Hydro-Lac maintain and drink more water and have positive responses in milk production.

“In warm weather, it’s a no brainer! It just makes good sense. Hydro-Lac is a tool that should be in everybody’s cattle feeding toolbox.”Ron Nykamp

Hydro-Lan Proven Cattle Hydration Product

Combat heat stress this summer!

To learn more about Hydro-Lac click here.

Original Source: FormAFeed Blog

Plan Ahead to Purchase Cenex® Grease this Summer for Gift Cards

Grease Summer Special

 

Starting June 15 through August 15, 2017, end-users can earn VISA® gift cards on qualifying Cenex® grease products. End-users will receive a $15 gift card for every qualifying 4-10 pack or 35-pound pail purchased during the qualifying time frame.

Customers may also receive a $50 VISA gift card for every qualifying 120-pound keg purchased during the promotional window. Qualifying grease products include: HD Moly Xtreme, Poly-Xtreme, Maxtron® EP, Blue Gard 500+, Molyplex 500+, ML 365®, Red Protect XT™ and Maxtron® FS.

How it works:
  1. Provide a copy of the redemption form to the end-user to submit their claim. These forms can be found in your 2017 Lubricants Marketing Program book or click here to print them directly.
  2. End-user completes the Summer Grease for Gift Cards redemption form, attaches required receipts, and mails it to CHS post-marked no later than September 15, 2017.

Questions? Contact your CHS Larsen Co-op representative.

 

Skin in the Game contest will send farmers to the Big Game

big game

To help its owners grow, CHS has launched a Skin in the Game essay/video contest. The contest will capture the next generation’s point of view regarding their local co-ops and the cooperative spirit. This will also identify a group of interested farmers and ranchers to participate in a roundtable discussion with CHS leaders about meeting agriculture’s changing needs.

The contest provides a choice of four topics and two different ways to enter (a written essay or a video). Eight winners will receive a multi-day VIP experience for two, including luxury-suite seats for the Big Game in February 2018 along with airfare, hotel accommodations, tickets to festival events, and more. Certain terms and conditions apply. To enter and for a copy of the official rules including judging criteria, visit chsBigGame.com.

Qualifications

Co-op customers who are actively involved in production agriculture are welcome to enter and share their co-op insights, stories and dreams. Deadline for entries is September 15, 2017. You must be at least 18 years old to win. Winners will be announced in October.

CHS is one of the official founding partners on the Minnesota Super Bowl Host Committee, which provides a high-profile platform to tell agriculture’s story.

 

© 2018 CHS Inc.