USDA Crop Progress

OMAHA (DTN) -- Soybean planting is on an average pace nationwide, but corn planting remains well behind average in the week ended April 22, according to USDA's National Ag Statistics Service's weekly Crop Progress report released Monday.

Soybeans are 2% planted, compared to 5% last year and a 2% average. Corn planting is 5% complete, compared to 3% last week, 15% last year and a 15% average.

Winter wheat is 13% headed, compared to 9% last week, 30% last year and a 19% average. Winter wheat condition improved slightly to 6% excellent, compared to 5% last week.

Here are some highlights from selected states:

Colorado

Several counties across the state received needed moisture in the form of rain and snow late in the week, helping to replenish diminishing soil moisture supplies, according to the Mountain Region Field Office of the National Agricultural Statistics Service, USDA, in Lakewood, Colorado. However, areas stricken by persistent drought conditions unfortunately remained dry, particularly southern counties. Reporters in northeastern counties noted corn planting began last week and welcome moisture was received. Concerns remained for non-irrigated crop and pastureland conditions still behind on moisture thus far.

In east-central counties, extremely high winds were reported again last week, contributing to grave fire danger and blowing of loose soil. Moisture received late in the week helped drought-stressed winter wheat, but much more is needed going forward. Producers faced difficulty spraying fields due to consistent high winds. Southwestern counties missed out on much of the moisture and drought conditions worsened. Reporters noted hay supplies remained short and producers were beginning to actively cull livestock in response to dire conditions. Low reservoir levels and dry stock ponds were also chief concerns going forward. The San Luis Valley received spotty precipitation, and high winds earlier in the week contributed to blowing soil and damaged structures. A reporter noted lower than normal water supplies reduced irrigation. In southeastern counties, high winds and fires were reported. Late week moisture was welcome and cool weather helped keep soil moisture from evaporating too quickly. Topsoil moisture: 25% very short, 28% short, 46% adequate, 1% surplus.

Illinois

Illinois experienced patches of rain, snow and cooler temperatures as limited planting and fieldwork continued. There were 2.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ended April 22, 2018. Statewide, the average temperature was 43.8 degrees, 10.9 degrees below normal. Precipitation averaged 0.13 inches, 0.82 inches below normal. Topsoil moisture: 3% short, 80% adequate, and 17% surplus. Subsoil moisture: 1% very short, 6% short, 82% adequate, and 11% surplus. Corn planted was at 4 percent, compared to 30 percent last year and the 5-year average of 20 percent. Winter wheat headed reached 4 percent, compared to 24 percent last year and the 5-year average of 6 percent. Winter wheat condition was rated at 1 percent very poor, 6 percent poor, 37 percent fair, 49 percent good, and 7 percent excellent.

Indiana

Cold weather coupled with snow in some areas continued to delay planting, according to Greg Matli, Indiana State Statistician for the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service. Sunlight and warmer temperatures arrived late last week but remained below average overall. Soil temperatures are still not at levels conducive for good germination. The average temperature for the week 43.6 degrees, 10.1 degrees below normal for the state. The amounts of rainfall varied from 0.00 inches to 0.97 inches over the week.

There were 2.5 days available for fieldwork for the week ending April 22.

Ground throughout the state is still cold and wet, but warmer temperatures and high winds helped to dry out some oversaturated fields. Some growers were able to plant corn over the weekend. Stand issues will be a concern in winter wheat where ponding and icing occurred. Fruit crop development is behind normal. The cool conditions have slowed pasture growth pushing farmers to rely on hay to feed livestock, but with the shortage of hay some farmers reluctantly made purchases where available. Livestock are reported to be in good condition. Other activities for the week included hauling grain, digging ditches, fertilization and tiling.

Iowa

The week began with below normal temperatures and counties in the northern half of Iowa received snow at midweek before temperatures warmed to near normal by the week's end. Statewide there were 1.5 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ended April 22, 2018, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service office in Des Moines. When conditions allowed, farmers applied anhydrous and dry fertilizer to their fields and seeded oats with a few scattered reports of corn being planted.

Topsoil moisture: 3% very short, 7 percent short, 74 percent adequate and 16 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 4 percent very short, 13 percent short, 72 percent adequate and 11 percent surplus. Northern Iowa has received an abundance of snow, while southern Iowa is in need of precipitation with south-central Iowa the driest.

Twenty-three percent of the expected oat crop has been planted, almost 2 weeks behind last year and the 5-year average. Below normal temperatures have delayed oat emergence, with just 1 percent of the crop being reported as emerged, the lowest level at this time since 2001.

Kansas

For the week ended April 22, 2018, there were 5.3 days suitable for fieldwork, according to the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service office in Manhattan, Kansas. Topsoil moisture: 32% very short, 32% short, 36% adequate, and 0% surplus. Subsoil moisture: 30% very short, 38% short, 31% adequate, and 1% surplus.

Winter wheat condition rated 16% very poor, 33% poor, 39% fair, 11% good, and 1% excellent. Winter wheat jointed was 35%, well behind 80% last year and 65% for the five-year average.

Corn planted was 15%, near 19% last year, and behind 24% average.

Michigan

There were 1.7 days suitable for fieldwork in Michigan during the week ended April 22, 2018 according to Marlo Johnson, Director of the Great Lakes Regional Office of the National Agricultural Statistics Service.

The week ending weather was much more favorable than last week. Warmer temperatures and dry conditions started to melt snow and thaw ground in northern Michigan. Most fields were still too saturated to do much fieldwork, but the State did see improved soil moisture levels. The winter wheat began to green up and oats planting progress advanced due to the nice weather. Sugarbeets that had been planted began to sprout and were on their way to emergence. Fieldwork towards the end of the week included preparing equipment, hauling manure, and spreading fertilizer.

Minnesota

Snow cover, additional precipitation and cooler temperatures resulted in another week with 0.0 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ended April 22, 2018, according to USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service office in St. Paul, Minnesota. Snow-covered areas were common across much of the state while those areas clear of snow were too cold and wet for fieldwork to be completed. Standing water was reported in some fields with many reports stating that frost is still in the ground. Producers kept busy preparing equipment for spring tillage and planting.

Topsoil moisture: 0% very short, 1% short, 56% adequate, and 43% surplus. Subsoil moisture: 0% very short, 3% short, 74% adequate, and 23% surplus.

Snow cover, wet and frozen ground, and cooler temperatures continued to delay planting of spring crops. Spring wheat planted was reported as 0% complete, 13 percentage points behind last year, and 25 points behind the 5-year average. Oats planted were reported as 0% complete, 27 percentage points behind last year, and 31 points behind the 5-year average.

Missouri

Average temperatures and precipitation for the week were well below average, hindering planting and growth throughout most of the state. Some freezing occurred in the western half of the state along with high winds throughout. Temperatures last week averaged 47.6 degrees, 9.8 degrees below normal. Precipitation averaged 0.17 inches statewide, 0.89 inches below normal. There were 5.2 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ending April 22, 2018. Topsoil moisture supply was rated 6% very short, 13% short, 73% adequate, and 8% surplus. Subsoil moisture supply was rated 4% very short, 15% short, 74% adequate, and 7% surplus. Corn planting was 16% complete, 26%age points behind the previous year and 19 percentage points behind the five-year average. Corn emerged progressed to 1%. Soybean planting was 1% complete. Rice planting progressed greatly from 11% last week to 35% this week due to more favorable planting conditions, though still 26 percentage points behind what was planted this time last year. Sorghum planted is at 1%, 9 percentage points behind last year. Winter wheat headed is at 2%, 49 percentage points behind last year and 12 percentage points behind the five-year average. Winter wheat condition was rated 49% good to excellent.

Nebraska

For the week ending April 22, 2018, there were 3.2 days suitable for fieldwork, according to the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 2% very short, 18 short, 76 adequate, and 4 surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 4% very short, 25 short, 70 adequate, and 1 surplus. Corn planted was 2%, behind 15 last year and 9 for the five-year average. Soybeans planted was 1%, near 3 last year, and equal to average. Winter wheat condition rated 1% very poor, 6 poor, 37 fair, 46 good, and 10 excellent. Oats planted was 46%, well behind 79 last year and 78 average. Emerged was 15%, well behind 37 both last year and average.

North Dakota

For the week ending April 22, 2018, there were 0.9 days suitable for fieldwork, according to the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service. Reports indicated that, on average, producers intended to begin fieldwork on May 2. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 9% very short, 29 short, 59 adequate, and 3 surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 14% very short, 34 short, 50 adequate, and 2 surplus. Winter wheat condition rated 30% good to excellent. Winter wheat jointed was 1%, near 4 last year.

Ohio

More wet and cold weather passed through Ohio last week keeping many operators out of the fields. There were 1.4 day suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending April 15, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician with the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service. Oats were planted last week at a slower pace compared to the five-year planted progress average. No reports of corn or soybeans going in the ground as planted progress continued to fall behind recent years due to poor weather conditions. Winter Wheat condition remains similar to last week and is rated mostly good to excellent, despite the weather. Winter wheat was rated 72% good to excellent.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma continued to suffer from extreme drought causing slower than normal winter wheat progress. Large wild fires were reported in the northwest portion of the state. According to the OCS Mesonet, the largest fire was in Dewey County and covered close to 300,000 acres. As of April 19th, drought conditions were rated 36% extreme to exceptional, up 36 points from the previous year, and 20% exceptional drought, up 20 points from the previous year. Statewide temperatures averaged in the high 60's. Topsoil and subsoil moisture conditions were rated mostly very short to adequate. There were 5.5 days suitable for fieldwork. Winter wheat jointing reached 78%, down 15 points from the previous year and down 14 points from normal. Winter wheat headed reached 23%, down 38 points from the previous year and down 15 points from normal. Canola blooming reached 61%, down 33 points from the previous year and down 24 points from normal. Canola coloring reached 3%, down 15 points from the previous year and down 1 point from normal. Rye jointing reached 87%, down 8 points from the previous year but up 2 points from normal. Rye headed reached 31%, down 34 oints from the previous year but up 12 points from normal. Oats jointing reached 42%, down 20 points from the previous year but up 2 points from normal. Corn planted reached 30%, down 13 points from the previous year and down 9 points from normal. Sorghum planted reached 9%, down 6 points from the previous year but unchanged from normal. Cotton planted reached 2%, down 3 points from the previous year but unchanged from normal. Wheat was rated 8% good to excellent.

South Dakota

For the week ending April 22, 2018, there were 0.5 days suitable for fieldwork, according to the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 2% very short, 11 short, 79 adequate, and 8 surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 5% very short, 23 short, 68 adequate, and 4 surplus. Winter wheat condition rated 20% good to excellent. Spring wheat planted was 2%, well behind 72 last year and 50 for the five-year average. Oats planted was 2%, well behind 65 last year and 54 average.

Texas

Dry, windy weather was experienced across many areas of Texas last week. Precipitation in East Texas, the Upper Coast, areas of South Central Texas and the Blacklands was reported between 0.5 and 2 inches, with isolated areas receiving upwards of 3 inches. The U.S. Drought Monitor showed more area in the High and Low Plains in extreme drought to exceptional drought conditions, while areas in the Edwards Plateau reached extreme drought conditions. There were 6.3 days suitable for fieldwork. Irrigation, where available, continued on wheat fields in the Northern High Plains. High winds and hot weather damaged wheat heads in areas of the Northern Low Plains. Winter wheat in the Southern Low Plains had begun to turn. Small grains in South Texas continued to dry out and mature. Some cotton, sorghum and soybeans were planted in the Blacklands, but most producers were waiting for warmer temperatures to plant. High winds damaged emerged cotton in the Coastal Bend. Producers in the Lower Valley were irrigating cotton fields. Corn planting had begun in the Southern Low Plains. Corn had begun to tassel in South Texas. Some cornfields in North East Texas were damaged by feral hogs. Progress of warm season vegetables in North East Texas had slowed due to cold temperatures. Producers continued to harvest citrus, onions and sugarcane in the Lower Valley. Cabbage was harvested in South Texas and the Lower Valley. Spinach producers in South Texas reported that spinach harvest will continue into May. Early planted potatoes were being prepared for harvest in some areas. Corn was rated 43% good to excellent. Wheat was rated 14% good to excellent.

Wisconsin

There were 0.3 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ending April 22, 2018, according to the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service. Last weekend's blizzard continued into Monday, with final snow totals of up to 30 inches in some areas. A second round of heavy, wet snow fell across southern Wisconsin on Wednesday, with up to 10 more inches of snow reported. Warm and sunny weather followed, however, with weekend temperatures in the upper 50s and low 60s. Reporters commented that the snow was melting quickly, recharging dry soils but leaving fields soggy. Overwintered crops were beginning to green up in the southern portions of the state, where farmers were hoping to start fieldwork soon. Reporters noted it might be a few weeks before central and northern Wisconsin can begin planting due to deep snow and still frozen ground. Manure spreading continued where fields were able to support machinery. Topsoil moisture supplies were rated 1% very short, 5% short, 70% adequate and 24% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies were rated 1% very short, 7% short, 76% adequate and 16% surplus. As of April 22, spring tillage was 2% complete statewide, unchanged from last week and now 11 days behind the five-year average. Oats planted were reported as 3% complete, 15 percentage points behind both last year and the five-year average. Winter wheat was 51% in good to excellent condition statewide, up 1 percentage point from last week.

Spring wheat is 3% planted, equal to last week. Last year the crop was 21% planted at this time, compared to a 25% average.

Barley is 11% planted, compared to 7% last week, 25% last year and a 33% average. Two percent of the crop is emerged, compared to 6% last year and an 8% average.

Cotton is 9% planted, compared to 8% last week, 11% last year and a 10% average. Rice is 49% planted, compared to 32% last week, 67% last year and 46% on average. Twenty-one percent of the crop is emerged, compared to 15% last week, 42% last year and a 27% average.

Sorghum is 24% planted, compared to 20% last week, 24% last year and a 23% average.

Oats are 31% planted, compared to 29% last week, 55% last year and a 55% average. Twenty-six percent of the crop is emerged, compared to 26% last week, 36% last year and a 35% average.

National Crop Progress Summary
This Last Last 5-Year
Week Week Year Avg.
Corn Planted 5 3 15 15
Soybeans Planted 2 5 2
Cotton Planted 9 8 11 10
Sorghum Planted 24 20 24 23
Spring Wheat Planted 3 3 21 25
Winter Wheat Headed 13 9 30 19
Barley Planted 11 7 25 33
Barley Emerged 2 6 8
Oats Planted 31 29 55 55
Oats Emerged 26 26 36 35
Rice Planted 49 32 67 46
Rice Emerged 21 15 42 27

**

National Crop Condition Summary
(VP=Very Poor; P=Poor; F=Fair; G=Good; E=Excellent)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VP P F G E VP P F G E VP P F G E
Winter Wheat 15 22 32 25 6 15 22 32 26 5 3 10 33 45 9

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(CZ)

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