Posts By: Anne Moore

Root Lesion Nematode Management in Wisconsin

By Alex Yost, YieldPoint Program Specialist

Deep below the snow and ice covering our fields this winter lives a pest commonly overlooked in agronomic management. The root lesion nematode (RLN) is a pest of over 400 crops and plants native to Wisconsin. The management issue with root lesion nematodes is the damage caused. The damage of a root lesion nematode is primarily diagnosed as being fungal or bacterial rots when seen on crops in season. RLN is a parasitic nematode meaning that it cannot kill it’s host plant or it will die itself. This means the nematode feeds on root cells, and when the cell dies it moves to the next, and so forth. Each wound caused by the feeding is then infected with rots and bacteria after the nematodes move on. In extreme cases damage can equate to death of the plant and field conditions similar to in the picture. Death to plants specifically correlated to nematode feeding is rare on crops after seedling stage, but yield penalties do occur further in the growing season.

At a recent conference in Madison I had the privilege to sit in on a presentation from Dr. Ann MacGuidwin, the nematode specialist for the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She spoke of the severity of RLN and other nematodes in Wisconsin fields, (needle nematodes, root knot nematodes, and soybean cyst nematodes). For the University of Madison 90% of all nematode tests that came in to the lab contained some number of RLN leading to further research into the severity on agronomic crops. Dr. MacGuidwin stated there was minimal data producing a threshold for treatment of RLN in-season but sufficient data can be drawn on pre-plant nematode testing in Wisconsin due to our winters reducing populations to a static number of nematodes in the soil. Contact your agronomist or myself for further information on nematode management, or if you feel like you have a nematode problem in your fields.

Dale Fire & Rescue Department Purchases New AED’s with CHS Safety Grant

On Tuesday, January 3, 2017, CHS Larsen Cooperative employees Todd Reif and Kelsey Luke awarded a CHS Safety grant for $4,000 to Dale Fire & Rescue Department members Max Krenke, Amie Jorgensen and Jamie Gore. The fire department plans to use these funds to purchase three Automatic Electronic Defibrillators (AED). They intend to equip two Medical First Responders (MFR) and leave the third AED mounted at CHS Larsen Cooperative Readfield location for quick access in case of cardiac incident at the facility.

There are approximated 5,000 people who reside in the district covered by Dale Fire and Rescue.  In the care continuum early CCR/AED intervention have proven to increase survival rates and our department is working on expanding its capability. By purchasing these additional units they hope to decrease delays in response time to critical cardiac calls, expand capability of MFR’s to utilize lifesaving equipment upon first contact with patient anywhere in the district and provide immediate intervention in a cardiac emergency at CHS Larsen Cooperative.

The Dale Fire and Rescue Department has a great working relationship with CHS Larsen Cooperative. Yearly, the fire department comes the co-op to do their annual training on advanced rescue and confined space, with neighboring mutual aid fire departments. The emphasis of this training is to further understanding of the cooperative’s facilities, its hazards, and how they can better handle any possible firefighting or rescue needs.

“Early intervention is a critical part of the Chain of Survival. Quick access to an AED is key component in the chain and this grant money will help us get AED’s into the hands of our First Responders. Thank you to CHS for the financial support in getting AED’s into the hands of Medical First Responders who need them,” said Robert Wilkins, EMS Director for Dale Fire & Rescue. “EMS is constantly changing, medical first responders are being asked to do more challenging skills in the field.  We can move one step closer to our goal with the help of CHS Larsen Co-op and this grant.”

CHS Larsen Cooperative is very grateful to have such a great department to work with in case of any future emergencies and is happy to provide opportunities to support them.

Picture Left to Right: Kelsey Luke, Amie Jorgensen, Jamie Gore, Todd Reif and Max Krenke.

On January 25 the Dale Fire and Rescue delivered the AED that will stay at our Readfield location. Pictured here left to right are Firefighter/First Responder, Chris Tews,  CHS Larsen General Manager, Todd Reif, Fire Chief, Jim Emmons and Firefighter/First Responder  Nick DeShaney.

Pamer and Sleik Participate in CHS New Leader Forum

Two local young producers learned how they can play a crucial role in helping agriculture and the cooperative system thrive during the CHS New Leaders Forum, hosted by CHS Inc., the nation’s leading cooperative and a global energy, grains and foods company.

Mike Pamer, Winnecone, Wis., and Bryan Sleik, Winnecone, Wis., were among more than 100 men and women from across the U.S. and Canada nominated to participate in the program held Nov. 29- Dec. 2, 2016, in conjunction with the CHS Annual Meeting. The participants represented CHS Larsen Cooperative, New London, Wis.

During the event, attendees explored more about the cooperative system, cooperative board leadership andsuccession planning. Pamer and Sleik also developed advocacy skills by participating in discussions on the issues and challenges facing cooperatives, agriculture and rural America.

Participants heard from CHS leaders including Carl Casale, CHS president and CEO; Jay Debertin, executive vice president and chief operating officer, Energy and Foods; Gary Halverson, vice president, Farm Supply, CHS Country Operations; and John Engelen, vice president, Government Affairs.  David Horsager, CEO, Horsager Leadership, also presented a workshop on the importance of building trust relationships and how it plays a vital role in local cooperatives and farming operations, while Steve Hamilton of The Land as Your Legacy® program illustrated the value of early succession planning.

The New Leaders Forum featured networking events with the CHS Board of Directors, management and employees which encouraged participants to voice their opinions on how CHS should evolve to best serve farmers for the future. Following theprogram attendees joined more than 2,000 CHS owners for the 2016 CHS Annual Meeting, which included agricultural-related educational sessions about the essential insights necessary to move forward in agriculture, the annual meeting business session and a keynote address by Peter Zeihan, a  geopolitical strategist.

Soil Compaction

By Seth Warner, YieldPoint Specialist

Here in northeast Wisconsin we tend to have very wet falls and springs which can cause concern for soil compaction. Having advancements of larger equipment has greatly reduced the issue because the weight is distributed over a larger surface area. However, even with smaller equipment, there are some things to keep in mind to reduce the issue. Did you know that one pass of equipment can cause 70% of compaction issues?

Knowing that equipment can have such an influence on soil we encourage farmers to keep traffic paths the same throughout the field. For example, it is better to concentrate the compaction to the headlands.  Contrary to popular belief, saturated soils will not get compacted like moist soils. The excessive water in the soil profile actually carries the weight of the load instead of the soil carrying it. Conversely, a deep tillage pass may not always be the right answer when ruts are made throughout the field. By using a soil compaction probe, you can determine what type of compaction issues are within your fields.

If you are finding compaction issues feel free to contact our YieldPoint Team to help decipher what actions you can take to help avoid future problems.

Wrapping Up 2016 Harvest

by Helen Nemitz, Grain Originator

Another harvest season has come to a close for most of our producers. As we reflect back it was a fast and furious one with added rain, which held off some of the acres to be harvested until we had a long stretch of freezing temperatures. That time has now come and we are feeling it all the way to our toes. Thank goodness December 21st is coming and days will start to get longer.

Abundance has been the name of the game this harvest season, with yields above average and quality at one of its highest levels. This means that the producers have more grain to sell/store at the elevator this year. LARGE CROPS and SPACE are two thoughts that have been on the minds of many this season. This concern can be put together with CONDO STORAGE. Do you know what it is? If not, ask your friendly grain employee.

Markets reflected the abundance and made some movement in a downward price direction that was anticipated, but others were unforeseen. The unexpected bright spot has been the positive movement of the bean market with demand for the oils. Producers have been on top of it and are taking advantage of the opportunities as they present themselves. Not only are producers marketing the bushels in the bins, they are also making plans for the next season ahead. Knowing what it takes to put the crop in the ground will help determine what needs to be covered for the input costs next year. Get some of it taken care of when you see rallies in the market. Have a plan – each producer has different needs—do you know yours?

Producers have worked hard to put grain in on-farm storage, so please make sure everyone is taking the precautions to care for it.  Fans need to be clear of debris and maintained so that air flow is not restricted and grain can stay fresh. When you are working with bins, safety is the number one concern. Always let others know what you are doing and when, that way your safety and their’s is taken into consideration.

As our loyal customers labored to get the harvest off the fields, all the employees at the elevators worked to receive it. A BIG THANK YOU to everyone for the long hours and days of work to get the harvest processed efficiently and safely.

HAVE A SAFE AND HAPPY HOLIDAY SEASON

Insurance for Your Equipment

By Kim Liesner, Energy Sales Manager

As a teenager, I would say that I like to take chances and live life on the edge!  I stayed out to late, never wore a seat belt, drove way too fast, ate pizza for breakfast, this list could go on and on!  Over the years, I realized that these were not my wisest decisions, especially the pepperoni pizza at 6 am, can you say heartburn.  Now that I am a parent, homeowner and generally responsible adult a lot of things have changed.  I have become more aware of what it takes to protect myself.  I keep my cash in the bank, not under my mattress, I always buckle up and I am adamant about making sure my homeowner and car insurance is always valid.

Now that we are all responsible adults, I am sure you can relate.

But I must ask this question; you insure your home, you insure your pick- up truck, your boat, you even carry life insurance, but what about your equipment?  I’m sure we can all agree that corn and milk prices could be better.  With a lower income coming in, what kind of a financial hardship would a blown engine on your 2013 JD S680 cause for you and your family?  Tractors and Combines are huge investments, and you need to protect this investment, just like you would protect your home from a fire or your vehicle from a crash!

cenex-tppIn an effort to help put your mind at ease, CHS Larsen Cooperative is proud to offer the Cenex Total Protection Plan (TPP) on new and used Farm equipment.  When you use Ruby Fieldmaster Diesel Fuel and Cenex lubricants, you get up to 10 years or 10,000 hours of engine and transmission coverage.

Think of it as a no-fault insurance policy- one that helps keep you in the field when you need to be there.  There is no deductible and no burden of proof, which can really pay off and help keep things moving during crunch times like harvest season!

Whether you buy new or used equipment, you simply will not find a better more economical way to protect your investment.

For more information, please contact the Energy Salesperson in your area

Kim Leisner, Sales Manager (north of GB) 920-598-1215

Dawn Matzke, CES (south of GB) 920-562-6902

Kyle, CES (west of Shawano) 715-340-3561

360 Yield Center Success

by: Ryan Jones, YieldPoint™ Program Specialist

360With the 2016 harvest coming to a close I would like to take a moment to tell you about two products we sold this fall from 360 Yield Center.

The first product is 360 Bullet, this is a replacement ripper point. The 360 Bullet point is designed to shatter the complete soil profile. The feedback we have heard from our growers running these points this year has been excellent. We still have 360 Bullet points in stock.

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The second product I would like to touch on is 360 Yield Saver.  360 Yield saver is designed to be a replacement to OEM gathering chains on a corn head. These chains are designed to reduce header loss by 80% by closing the gaps in traditional deck plates and gathering chains. We gathered some information from a few demos around the area and we are seeing a consistent yield advantage. We will have more information on these as we get our plots finalized from this year.
Contact your YieldPoint Specialist if you’d like to receive more information.

November Harvest Update

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by Helen Nemitz, Grain Originator
Harvest continues, as we go along Mother Nature is doing her part in aiding in the release of moisture from the remaining beans and the abundant corn that is still standing in the fields. The beans are finally coming in under 13% on a consistent basis and some corn has gone from low 20’s to 16% moisture.
We are seeing great progress in field work as farmers are wrapping up the harvest and doing fall tillage. Some areas are still very wet which makes it harder to get the harvest off the fields. Those acres may have to wait for a longer period of freezing temperatures and yes that “S” word, Snow. This has been one of the warmer falls with temperatures that I can handle this late in November Any time I do not have to have my three shirts and a coat/gloves/boots, winter apparel on, is a great time. Others do not agree and would like to see the cold here already, but that is what makes it great, we can all have our own opinion.
At the elevator we are doing all we can to make space for the bumper crop and help our loyal patrons get done with this year’s awesome crop. Some of you may have noticed we have our pile done and covered in Readfield.  A big thank you goes out to all who have been patient with what we have been doing to continue to have grain flow through the elevator. Full does not mean that we are done for the season. Sometimes, it just means we need a day or two to move more out.
Just a gentle reminder to please call ahead for hours at the different facilities this time of year and thank you again for your continued patience and loyalty.
Have a safe Deer Hunting season and a very Happy Thanksgiving with your family and friends!!!

Are you Using the Right Grease? 

by Kim Leisner Energy Sales Manager

cenexgreasetubefamilyAs Harvest pushes through, the next item that comes to mind would be your fall maintenance.

After working your tractors, combines, harvesters, and your fifth-wheel semis for long hours, and in tough conditions, it’s time to give your equipment the pampering it deserves.  A little TLC for a different kind of employee, “the workers with wheels”.

Proper lubrication through greasing is one of the single most important factors in contributing to the longevity of your equipment and protecting your investment.

However, the question stands, are you using the right grease for each piece of equipment?  The thing to remember is not all things are created equally. Just like tractors (ex: Case IH vs. John Deere), the same is known when dealing with grease. When choosing a grease there are many factors to consider. We need to think about chemical compatibility and the NLGI rating. These can make for some serious frustration, and can make a final decision somewhat confusing.
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Weyauwega Annual Fire District Training at CHS Feed Mill

img_6658On Monday, October 10, 2016 the Weyauwega Area Fire District held a training on grain rescue safety for their volunteer fire fighters at CHS Larsen Cooperative, in Weyauwega. Harvest is well underway and farmers will soon be filling their grain bins again. Working in grain bins can be a dangerous activity. Thus, it is very important to be prepared for any unforeseen emergencies during harvest and have the proper training and equipment.

During the training on Monday night the fire department practiced a few rescue scenarios. They used their Grain Rescue Equipment, including the Great Wall of Rescue, ropes, and harnesses, which they were able to purchase last year with a CHS safety Grant. They partially buried a volunteer firefighter in a load of corn at the mill and then used the Great Wall of Rescue, which acts as a cofferdam, to properly rescue a victim out of loose grain. (more…)

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