Case Trident has Arrived

Case Trident
 In mid-April, we received our brand new Case Trident Patriot® Spreader.

This is one of six Case Trident’s made this year as test run for Case. They are using our machine to pull data to fine tune this model for final production. We are one of two cooperatives in Wisconsin with this machine. The technology on this machine is a brand new design.

This will allow us the opportunity to apply two dry products at one time. It has technology on the box that will slow down the spinner on the edge of the field, so this will allow us to keep more product in the field, giving us more precise control of application. This also has a unique air suspension shock system which gives better control in the field and better precision in applying. It also has true 4-wheel drive.

CHS Larsen Co-op Employee Randy Weyland is the designated operator of this new machine. Ed Danke, Jeff Buttles, and Andy Colrue will be potentially also run this machine when needed.

By Scott Jones, Agronomy Department Manager

 

The 4 R’s For Nitrogen Management and Corn Production in Wisconsin

By Alex Yost, YieldPoint™ Program Specialist

Recently the Agri-View newspaper published an insert of UW Discovery farms research in Buffalo County, this Insert sparked my interest as I read about the sustainability techniques and cropping system that the grower utilized to minimize field runoff and maximize his production. The article partially touches on nitrogen use, but emphasizes the use of the 4 R’s of sustainability, the right source, the right rate, right timing, and the right placement. All of these techniques can lead to increased yields and sometimes decreased costs on farms across the state. Managing the 4 R’s can be a headache for your operation if not assisted by the professional minds of CHS Larsen Cooperative.

Starting with the right source, CHS Larsen Cooperative offers an assortment of types of nitrogen fertilizer, talking with your agronomist and YieldPoint™ representative can help find you the right source of nitrogen to best suit your cropping system.

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CHS YieldPoint High Efficiency Farming Seminar March 7th

CHS Larsen Cooperative is hosting a High Efficiency Farming Seminar on Tuesday, March 7, 2017. All are invited to come and get answers to your crop planning, while exploring the latest technologies available to maximize crop production success!

There will be a full house of new and updated equipment on display. The seminar will include presentations from the nations leading precision Ag Companies, including: Precision Planting, 360 Yield Center, Crop IMS/Ag Leader, Meridian, Yetter, and Harvest International.

You also have the opportunity to win some great door prizes! We will be giving away an Ag Leader Compass Display, Craftsman Tool Sets, and Soil Scan program certificates.

Doors open at 9 a.m. Tuesday, March 7, 2017; Meeting 9:15 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

RSVP to Ryan Jones at 920-410-0649.

The full line up of speakers are as follows:

“The Planter of Tomorrow is in Your Shed Today” – Mike Schlitt, Precision Planting
“A Planter Designed for Precision” – Dustin Friesen, Harvest International
“Unlocking Your Full Yield Potential” – Aaron Phillips, 360 Yield Center
“Work Smarter Not Harder” – Andy Briggs, Crop IMS / Ag Leader
“Profitable Solutions for Production Ag.” -Tyler Thomas, Yetter
“Innovators of Seed Handling” – Lewis Wenell, Meridian

Bring canned goods for Harvest for Hunger and you’ll receive an additional raffle ticket! 

 

More Choices to Control Broadleaf Weeds

by Matt McKown, Agronomy Sales Manager

With the EPA’s approval of the low volatility dicamba products, farmers now have more choices for the control of broadleaf weeds such as palmer amaranth, waterhemp, marestail as well as tough to control lambsquarter and velvetleaf. By combining innovative trait technologies and herbicide options this will help maximize weed control and increase yield potential. This allows us to utilize dicamba and glyphosate for pre-planting and an in-crop option RoundUp Ready 2 Xtend® soybeans.

With this approval there are some standard restrictions such as:

  • It may not be applied by aircraft
  • It may not be applied in winds over 15mph
  • It can only be applied by specific nozzles at specific rates
  • It must have a within-field buffer of 110 to 220 feet depending on application rate

We also need to be very mindful of specialty crops and other plant life that could be damaged from the use of the dicamba products. The EPA requires very specific and rigorous drift mitigation measures for the use of these products. Always make sure to fully read the label before use. Give your CHS agronomist a call to learn more about dicamba products and the RoundUp Ready 2 Xtend® soybeans for the 2017 planting season.

Root Lesion Nematode Management in Wisconsin

By Alex Yost, YieldPoint Program Specialist

Deep below the snow and ice covering our fields this winter lives a pest commonly overlooked in agronomic management. The root lesion nematode (RLN) is a pest of over 400 crops and plants native to Wisconsin. The management issue with root lesion nematodes is the damage caused. The damage of a root lesion nematode is primarily diagnosed as being fungal or bacterial rots when seen on crops in season. RLN is a parasitic nematode meaning that it cannot kill it’s host plant or it will die itself. This means the nematode feeds on root cells, and when the cell dies it moves to the next, and so forth. Each wound caused by the feeding is then infected with rots and bacteria after the nematodes move on. In extreme cases damage can equate to death of the plant and field conditions similar to in the picture. Death to plants specifically correlated to nematode feeding is rare on crops after seedling stage, but yield penalties do occur further in the growing season.

At a recent conference in Madison I had the privilege to sit in on a presentation from Dr. Ann MacGuidwin, the nematode specialist for the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She spoke of the severity of RLN and other nematodes in Wisconsin fields, (needle nematodes, root knot nematodes, and soybean cyst nematodes). For the University of Madison 90% of all nematode tests that came in to the lab contained some number of RLN leading to further research into the severity on agronomic crops. Dr. MacGuidwin stated there was minimal data producing a threshold for treatment of RLN in-season but sufficient data can be drawn on pre-plant nematode testing in Wisconsin due to our winters reducing populations to a static number of nematodes in the soil. Contact your agronomist or myself for further information on nematode management, or if you feel like you have a nematode problem in your fields.

3 Challenges Growers Face in Current Agriculture Landscape

 

It’s easy to look around and see how agriculture impacts our world. This might be one of the reasons you chose a career in production agriculture. Even though you love your chosen career path, it doesn’t mean there aren’t challenges out there every day. The difference between the successful growers and the ones who aren’t as successful is how they approach the challenges that come their way.

The best way to solve a challenge is by looking at the opportunities behind the challenge and then taking control of your own destiny. The following are three very different challenges, but each with opportunities for you to succeed.

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Soil Compaction

By Seth Warner, YieldPoint Specialist

Here in northeast Wisconsin we tend to have very wet falls and springs which can cause concern for soil compaction. Having advancements of larger equipment has greatly reduced the issue because the weight is distributed over a larger surface area. However, even with smaller equipment, there are some things to keep in mind to reduce the issue. Did you know that one pass of equipment can cause 70% of compaction issues?

Knowing that equipment can have such an influence on soil we encourage farmers to keep traffic paths the same throughout the field. For example, it is better to concentrate the compaction to the headlands.  Contrary to popular belief, saturated soils will not get compacted like moist soils. The excessive water in the soil profile actually carries the weight of the load instead of the soil carrying it. Conversely, a deep tillage pass may not always be the right answer when ruts are made throughout the field. By using a soil compaction probe, you can determine what type of compaction issues are within your fields.

If you are finding compaction issues feel free to contact our YieldPoint Team to help decipher what actions you can take to help avoid future problems.

Technology Helps Growers with Environmental Stewardship

environmental stewardship

Growers are often called stewards of the land, and with the supply and demand increasing at a rapid pace they are also looked upon to produce higher quantities of food and grain in the same amount of time, all while protecting the environment.

Thanks to today’s innovative technology, environmental concerns including soil erosion, animal welfare and nutrient runoff can be minimized or prevented.

Farms are becoming increasingly progressive and the use of technology has made farming practices more sustainable to the environment than we have ever seen in history.

Improvements in technology continue to help growers with their environmental stewardship efforts, including: (more…)

Seed Selection Considerations for Soybeans and Corn

seed-selection
Image courtesy United Soybean Board

There are a number of factors that need to be considered when selecting a seed variety, and it’s no easy task for growers these days. Below are some considerations for seed selection, for soybeans and for corn.

Soybeans

  1. When selecting soybean seed for the upcoming planting season, the first factor to take into account is the maturity rating of the soybean you’re selecting. Selecting a seed variety that’s well suited to your geography enables the crop to move through its lifecycle efficiently in a way that best matches its environment. Selecting the correct maturity rating allows the crop to take full advantage of the growing season in your area and helps maximize your yield potential.
    A bean with too early of a maturity rating for your geography can leave yield potential on the table by not taking advantage of the additional growing days. On the other hand, if you select a variety with too late of a maturity rating for your geography, you risk the beans not reaching physiological maturity before the frost. Knowing how a variety will work within your specific geographic conditions help strike a balance that will aid in procuring the highest potential yield for your crop.

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360 Yield Center Success

by: Ryan Jones, YieldPoint™ Program Specialist

360With the 2016 harvest coming to a close I would like to take a moment to tell you about two products we sold this fall from 360 Yield Center.

The first product is 360 Bullet, this is a replacement ripper point. The 360 Bullet point is designed to shatter the complete soil profile. The feedback we have heard from our growers running these points this year has been excellent. We still have 360 Bullet points in stock.

 brush

The second product I would like to touch on is 360 Yield Saver.  360 Yield saver is designed to be a replacement to OEM gathering chains on a corn head. These chains are designed to reduce header loss by 80% by closing the gaps in traditional deck plates and gathering chains. We gathered some information from a few demos around the area and we are seeing a consistent yield advantage. We will have more information on these as we get our plots finalized from this year.
Contact your YieldPoint Specialist if you’d like to receive more information.

© 2018 CHS Inc.