Harvest For Hunger Kicks Off March 1st

CHS Larsen Cooperative is excited to launch this year’s Harvest for Hunger campaign. Each year CHS Larsen Cooperative, and CHS Inc. team up to collect food, monetary, and crop donations to help keep local food pantry shelves stocked. As part of CHS Harvest for Hunger food and fund drive, CHS Larsen Cooperative will accept contributions from March 1 through March 20 at its locations in New London, Readfield, Center Valley, Weyauwega, Larsen, and Oconto Falls; we will then deliver all collections to our local food pantries.

Hunger is a reality for more than 40 million people in America, including 13.1 million children. Every dollar we raise through CHS Harvest for Hunger can purchase six pounds of food through our food banks. That’s making a real difference for those in need.

Financial donations are encouraged because they enable food banks to leverage their buying power to provide nutritious food at deeply discounted rates. In 2016, CHS Larsen Cooperative raised $5,393.55 and over 1,890 pounds of food which their parent company, CHS, added bonus dollars, bringing the 2016 total to $11,207.55. This all stayed in the communities in which we reside.

We will be hosting a 10 days of giving or $10 challenge at each of our locations to encourage collections, check our website out for more details. Non-perishable food items and monetary donations will be accepted. You can also bring your donations to the Early Seed pick up days in New London. If you would like to donate to this cause but are unable to drop it off at one of our locations please contact Cathie Hansen at our main office 920-982-1111 and she will send someone out to pick up the donation. Or you may mail a check to CHS Larsen Cooperative Attn: Harvest for Hunger P.O. Box 308 New London WI, 54961.

You will see 100% of the proceeds stay local in our surrounding area food pantries. CHS Country Operations matches a portion of all donations raised. Please help us make this year’s CHS Harvest for Hunger another successful year. Let’s fight hunger together!

We thank you for your generosity!

CHS Larsen Cooperative Offers up to $20,000 in Scholarships

CHS Larsen Cooperative is proud to announce that we will be offering up to $20,000 in scholarships. This is the seventeenth year they have offered a scholarship program for their customers; already helping over 200 students. CHS Larsen Cooperative’s trade territory has expanded and they have felt the need to return support to the communities that help support their cooperative.

CHS Larsen Cooperative is offering graduating high school seniors and currently enrolled post high school education students a chance to apply for up to $20,000 in scholarships. Students must be furthering their education in agricultural or nonagricultural major at a two-year agricultural short course program, technical school, a two-year school, or a four-year college. To be eligible, the student, parent, or guardian must be a patron member of CHS Larsen Cooperative.

The criteria and 2016 application are on their website CHSLarsenCooperative.com/community/scholarship. The deadline for the CHS Larsen Cooperative scholarship is March 15, 2017. Visit their website to download the application or call 1-800-924-6677.

In addition to their local scholarship, CHS Inc. Foundation awards more than 300- $1,000 scholarships. To apply for the CHS Foundation scholarship go to chsinc.com/stewardships/scholarships. The deadline for the foundation scholarship is April 1, 2017.

CHS Larsen Cooperative is proud to support our local youth in agriculture. It pays to invest in our local future agricultural business leaders.

Dale Fire & Rescue Department Purchases New AED’s with CHS Safety Grant

On Tuesday, January 3, 2017, CHS Larsen Cooperative employees Todd Reif and Kelsey Luke awarded a CHS Safety grant for $4,000 to Dale Fire & Rescue Department members Max Krenke, Amie Jorgensen and Jamie Gore. The fire department plans to use these funds to purchase three Automatic Electronic Defibrillators (AED). They intend to equip two Medical First Responders (MFR) and leave the third AED mounted at CHS Larsen Cooperative Readfield location for quick access in case of cardiac incident at the facility.

There are approximated 5,000 people who reside in the district covered by Dale Fire and Rescue.  In the care continuum early CCR/AED intervention have proven to increase survival rates and our department is working on expanding its capability. By purchasing these additional units they hope to decrease delays in response time to critical cardiac calls, expand capability of MFR’s to utilize lifesaving equipment upon first contact with patient anywhere in the district and provide immediate intervention in a cardiac emergency at CHS Larsen Cooperative.

The Dale Fire and Rescue Department has a great working relationship with CHS Larsen Cooperative. Yearly, the fire department comes the co-op to do their annual training on advanced rescue and confined space, with neighboring mutual aid fire departments. The emphasis of this training is to further understanding of the cooperative’s facilities, its hazards, and how they can better handle any possible firefighting or rescue needs.

“Early intervention is a critical part of the Chain of Survival. Quick access to an AED is key component in the chain and this grant money will help us get AED’s into the hands of our First Responders. Thank you to CHS for the financial support in getting AED’s into the hands of Medical First Responders who need them,” said Robert Wilkins, EMS Director for Dale Fire & Rescue. “EMS is constantly changing, medical first responders are being asked to do more challenging skills in the field.  We can move one step closer to our goal with the help of CHS Larsen Co-op and this grant.”

CHS Larsen Cooperative is very grateful to have such a great department to work with in case of any future emergencies and is happy to provide opportunities to support them.

Picture Left to Right: Kelsey Luke, Amie Jorgensen, Jamie Gore, Todd Reif and Max Krenke.

On January 25 the Dale Fire and Rescue delivered the AED that will stay at our Readfield location. Pictured here left to right are Firefighter/First Responder, Chris Tews,  CHS Larsen General Manager, Todd Reif, Fire Chief, Jim Emmons and Firefighter/First Responder  Nick DeShaney.

Pamer and Sleik Participate in CHS New Leader Forum

Two local young producers learned how they can play a crucial role in helping agriculture and the cooperative system thrive during the CHS New Leaders Forum, hosted by CHS Inc., the nation’s leading cooperative and a global energy, grains and foods company.

Mike Pamer, Winnecone, Wis., and Bryan Sleik, Winnecone, Wis., were among more than 100 men and women from across the U.S. and Canada nominated to participate in the program held Nov. 29- Dec. 2, 2016, in conjunction with the CHS Annual Meeting. The participants represented CHS Larsen Cooperative, New London, Wis.

During the event, attendees explored more about the cooperative system, cooperative board leadership andsuccession planning. Pamer and Sleik also developed advocacy skills by participating in discussions on the issues and challenges facing cooperatives, agriculture and rural America.

Participants heard from CHS leaders including Carl Casale, CHS president and CEO; Jay Debertin, executive vice president and chief operating officer, Energy and Foods; Gary Halverson, vice president, Farm Supply, CHS Country Operations; and John Engelen, vice president, Government Affairs.  David Horsager, CEO, Horsager Leadership, also presented a workshop on the importance of building trust relationships and how it plays a vital role in local cooperatives and farming operations, while Steve Hamilton of The Land as Your Legacy® program illustrated the value of early succession planning.

The New Leaders Forum featured networking events with the CHS Board of Directors, management and employees which encouraged participants to voice their opinions on how CHS should evolve to best serve farmers for the future. Following theprogram attendees joined more than 2,000 CHS owners for the 2016 CHS Annual Meeting, which included agricultural-related educational sessions about the essential insights necessary to move forward in agriculture, the annual meeting business session and a keynote address by Peter Zeihan, a  geopolitical strategist.

CHS Annual Meeting delegates approve amendments to articles and bylaws

Delegates to the CHS Annual Meeting have approved amendments to the CHS Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws. The amendments created a new membership class structure and criteria.

“We appreciate our owners’ commitment to the governance of the company they own, as evidenced by their strong interest in the proposed changes to the core CHS governing documents” says CHS Board Chairman David Bielenberg. “Having a voice in the governance of the company you own and do business with is an essential point of difference of the cooperative business model.”

The two resolutions – one amending the company’s articles and the other amending the CHS bylaws – each received a “yes” vote of more than 86 percent.

When the CHS Board reconvenes in 2017, it will work to develop procedures regarding implementation and for members to periodically certify their ongoing eligibility for their membership class. “We are committed to keeping members fully informed,” Bielenberg says.

Steve Fritel, chairman of the CHS Board’s Governance Committee, says the board took its commitment to communication seriously by listening to owners, keeping the proposed changes simple and ensuring there was time for learning and conversation.

“Our goal is always to ensure that CHS remains an agricultural-focused and producer-governed cooperative,” Fritel said. “At the same time, we also recognize we must accommodate our current members as they change to stay relevant to their customers. Our articles and bylaws need to line up with the ways our members do business today, while recognizing the strong heritage of the member cooperatives who built today’s CHS.”

View details of the new membership classes on the CHS Governance page.

CHS posts fiscal 2016 earnings of $424.2 million

2016 Harvest

ST. PAUL, MINN. (Nov. 3, 2016) – CHS Inc., the nation’s leading farmer-owned cooperative and a global energy, grains and foods company, today announced earnings for fiscal 2016 of $424.2 million.

CHS net income for fiscal 2016 (Sept. 1, 2015 – Aug. 31, 2016) of $424.2 million was down 46 percent from $781.0 million for fiscal 2015, reflecting lower pre-tax earnings within the company’s Energy and Ag segments, as well as its Corporate and Other category. Lower pre-tax earnings within these two segments were partly offset by increased pretax earnings in its Foods segment, and seven months of earnings from its Nitrogen Production segment which was created by the February 2016 strategic investment CHS made in CF Industries Nitrogen, LLC (CF Nitrogen). These results reflect the continued economic down cycle in the company’s core energy and agriculture businesses, as well as the impact of one-time events.

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CHS Board addresses 2016 equity management; delays individual equity redemption program changes

equity300The CHS Board has delayed implementation of the company’s new individual equity redemption program, a decision made following its regular review of the CHS equity management program.

“This decision was made as we considered a number of factors, including our commitment to balance sheet management and the current economic cycle,” says CHS Board Chairman Dave Bielenberg. “CHS remains financially sound and profitable, but as we navigate this economic cycle, the board believes this delay was appropriate as we continue to take a long-term view in managing equity redemptions.”

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Weyauwega Annual Fire District Training at CHS Feed Mill

img_6658On Monday, October 10, 2016 the Weyauwega Area Fire District held a training on grain rescue safety for their volunteer fire fighters at CHS Larsen Cooperative, in Weyauwega. Harvest is well underway and farmers will soon be filling their grain bins again. Working in grain bins can be a dangerous activity. Thus, it is very important to be prepared for any unforeseen emergencies during harvest and have the proper training and equipment.

During the training on Monday night the fire department practiced a few rescue scenarios. They used their Grain Rescue Equipment, including the Great Wall of Rescue, ropes, and harnesses, which they were able to purchase last year with a CHS safety Grant. They partially buried a volunteer firefighter in a load of corn at the mill and then used the Great Wall of Rescue, which acts as a cofferdam, to properly rescue a victim out of loose grain. (more…)

 October Is Co-op Month

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CHS Larsen Cooperative is proud to announce that October is National Cooperative Month. After all, what better time could there be than during harvest to reflect on everything cooperatives do for the farmers and ranchers who own them? As you’re busy bringing in what promises to be another banner harvest, consider how rural co-ops, empowered by the combined strength of their  owners, ensure the steady supply of affordable inputs that make your crop possible. Co-ops help fuel machinery, as well as your entire operation, by providing the diesel fuel, agronomic expertise, seed, fertilizers, financing and crop protection you need — all to  protect your bottom line. Co-ops also provide access to broader world markets, for higher profitability. Now more than ever, ag operations are technology driven, and once again the co-op is there to help you stay current. Because the co-op is a business you own, you can trust it has your long-term interests in mind. And there’s no better proof than the patronage you receive just for doing business with a cooperative, as well as the reinvestment the co-op makes in order to serve your changing needs and stay relevant for generations.

Cooperatives like CHS Larsen Co-op build jobs, local communities and, ultimately, a stronger America. Here we have 110 full-time and 25 part-time workers and generate nearly 131 million dollars sales annually. That’s revenue that stays in the North Eastern Wisconsin area rather than going to some out-of-state (or out-of-country) business conglomerate. It’s money that feeds the local economy, causing a ripple effect as it travels through the local equipment dealership, grocery store, bank, restaurant, church and so on. It helps keep our young people firmly planted in the area, and it’s money we use to invest in them so that they can become the community leaders of the future. It’s dollars we put toward ensuring the safety of everyone who lives here, and it’s extended toward schools, public outreach programs and infrastructure that help keep our towns vibrant.

While the annual celebration of the co-op only lasts a month, the benefits of the cooperative system are there for you all year long.

This year we are sharing cooperative facts each day. Be sure to follow our social media Twitter and Facebook to learn these fun facts!

Town of Center Fire Department awarded CHS Safety Grant

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On Friday, September 23, 2016 CHS Larsen Cooperative employees Jeremy Hunt, Andy VanDyck and Mary Kay Cleven awarded a CHS Safety grant for $1,825 to the Town of Center Fire Department Joe Hofacker, Fire Chief  and Matt Harrison. The fire department plans to use these funds to purchase a multi gas monitor. This would give them the tools to recognize and monitor hazardous gas furthering their capabilities in keeping our community safe.

The Town of Center Fire Department has a great working relationship with CHS Larsen Cooperative. Yearly, the fire department comes the co-op to do their annual training on advanced rescue and confined space, with neighboring mutual aid fire department. The emphasis of this training is to further understanding of the cooperative’s facilities, its hazards, and how they can better handle any possible firefighting or rescue needs.

This multi gas meter will help the fire department serve the community and the co-op by giving them the ability during an emergency call to detect a possible gas leak and to monitor for the presence of other dangerous gases. This is useful when determining if a home is safe for its occupants or if a location at the co-op is safe for firefighters to operate in. (more…)

© 2018 CHS Inc.