Celebrate National Ag Day on March 21

“Growing up in rural South Dakota, surrounded by farms and ranches as far as the eye could see, I never gave the food supply chain a second thought. It was intertwined in everything I did,” writes Mark Biedenfeld, vice president, CHS Aligned Solutions on the Ag Day blog. He goes on to emphasize the important role those in agriculture play in helping our broader communities understand where their food comes from.

Biedenfeld joins others in contributing to the blog in a nod to National Ag Day, coming up this Tuesday, March 21. The celebration is now a tradition across the U.S., created to recognize and celebrate the abundance provided by agriculture. Agriculture provides almost everything we eat, use and eat on a daily basis, and is increasingly contributing to fuel and other bio-products. (more…)

Working to Help Educate Fox Valley Tech Students about Ag Careers

CHS Larsen Cooperative is proud to support Fox Valley Technical College (FVTC) as they work together to help educate the next generation in ag. For over 20 years they have had a strong working relationship with the tech school’s Ag department. This week CHS employees helped give hands on experiences to students that are interested in going into the Ag industry.

(more…)

5 Ways to Ensure the Best Stand

stand establishment

LivingLandscapeArchitecture

Uniform stand establishment is a critical component in achieving maximum yield potential. With unexpected weather and other uncontrollable factors often impacting the crop’s stand, it is even more important to be proactive in the areas that can be controlled. Fortunately, there are steps to help get your crop off to a strong start and encourage a strong and healthy stand.

1. Seed Selection

Each season it all starts with selecting your seed. There are multiple considerations growers need to be aware of when selecting the appropriate seed, including the geography, any unique field conditions, potential impact from weeds, disease and pests, maturity timing, etc. These considerations need to be evaluated in cooperation with your farm management practices to ensure the best results. Read more on considerations for seed selection, for soybeans and for corn. (more…)

The Future of Drones in Agriculture

drones in agriculture

 

Could drones be the future of agriculture – and a game-changer?

According to a late 2016 article in Successful Farming, drones also known as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) were first received with hesitation in the agriculture industry. Although the new technology was known to provide growers with a way to see potential problems that wouldn’t otherwise be known from ground level, the new technology was taken with initial apprehension due to the lack of regulations, in addition to the sometimes challenging process of applying for a Section 333 exemption through the FAA.

Slowly but surely, the agriculture industry is realizing the benefits and discovering different strategies on how drones can benefit and move their crop production plans forward. (more…)

Using Soil Sampling Results To Improve Your Next Crop

soil sampling

 

We recently discussed the importance of soil sampling and what growers learn from testing samples from their field. Now we want to look more at what the results can tell the grower and how it can help them improve their next crop.

As growers receive information regarding organic matter, soil pH, Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC), Nitrate-N and extractable macro and micro nutrients from their soil sample results, they will be able to make more informed fertility decisions, and address potential issues in advance or during the early stages of the plant’s growth cycle.

The results also provide a holistic view of the health of the soil, and can help provide growers with an indication of success for their fertility philosophy by determining if the following are needed:

  • Building nutrient levels
  • Maintaining nutrient levels
  • Reducing of specific mineral levels

(more…)

Identifying Grain Bin Hazards

grain bin hazard - flowing grainGrain bin hazards aren’t limited to entrapment or engulfment. Other, equally-hazardous situations include augers, bin collapses, Power Take-Offs (PTOs), fires and explosions, toxic atmospheres, electrical components and even ladders.

Identifying and understanding bin hazards is vital to keeping you and others safe. Learn more about some of the more common and hazardous situations that can occur when working with grain bins.

CHS YieldPoint High Efficiency Farming Seminar March 7th

CHS Larsen Cooperative is hosting a High Efficiency Farming Seminar on Tuesday, March 7, 2017. All are invited to come and get answers to your crop planning, while exploring the latest technologies available to maximize crop production success!

There will be a full house of new and updated equipment on display. The seminar will include presentations from the nations leading precision Ag Companies, including: Precision Planting, 360 Yield Center, Crop IMS/Ag Leader, Meridian, Yetter, and Harvest International.

You also have the opportunity to win some great door prizes! We will be giving away an Ag Leader Compass Display, Craftsman Tool Sets, and Soil Scan program certificates.

Doors open at 9 a.m. Tuesday, March 7, 2017; Meeting 9:15 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

RSVP to Ryan Jones at 920-410-0649.

The full line up of speakers are as follows:

“The Planter of Tomorrow is in Your Shed Today” – Mike Schlitt, Precision Planting
“A Planter Designed for Precision” – Dustin Friesen, Harvest International
“Unlocking Your Full Yield Potential” – Aaron Phillips, 360 Yield Center
“Work Smarter Not Harder” – Andy Briggs, Crop IMS / Ag Leader
“Profitable Solutions for Production Ag.” -Tyler Thomas, Yetter
“Innovators of Seed Handling” – Lewis Wenell, Meridian

Bring canned goods for Harvest for Hunger and you’ll receive an additional raffle ticket! 

 

Harvest For Hunger Kicks Off March 1st

CHS Larsen Cooperative is excited to launch this year’s Harvest for Hunger campaign. Each year CHS Larsen Cooperative, and CHS Inc. team up to collect food, monetary, and crop donations to help keep local food pantry shelves stocked. As part of CHS Harvest for Hunger food and fund drive, CHS Larsen Cooperative will accept contributions from March 1 through March 20 at its locations in New London, Readfield, Center Valley, Weyauwega, Larsen, and Oconto Falls; we will then deliver all collections to our local food pantries.

Hunger is a reality for more than 40 million people in America, including 13.1 million children. Every dollar we raise through CHS Harvest for Hunger can purchase six pounds of food through our food banks. That’s making a real difference for those in need.

Financial donations are encouraged because they enable food banks to leverage their buying power to provide nutritious food at deeply discounted rates. In 2016, CHS Larsen Cooperative raised $5,393.55 and over 1,890 pounds of food which their parent company, CHS, added bonus dollars, bringing the 2016 total to $11,207.55. This all stayed in the communities in which we reside.

We will be hosting a 10 days of giving or $10 challenge at each of our locations to encourage collections, check our website out for more details. Non-perishable food items and monetary donations will be accepted. You can also bring your donations to the Early Seed pick up days in New London. If you would like to donate to this cause but are unable to drop it off at one of our locations please contact Cathie Hansen at our main office 920-982-1111 and she will send someone out to pick up the donation. Or you may mail a check to CHS Larsen Cooperative Attn: Harvest for Hunger P.O. Box 308 New London WI, 54961.

You will see 100% of the proceeds stay local in our surrounding area food pantries. CHS Country Operations matches a portion of all donations raised. Please help us make this year’s CHS Harvest for Hunger another successful year. Let’s fight hunger together!

We thank you for your generosity!

Grain Bin Entrapment: What if it Happens to You?

grain bin entrapment safety trainingA man unloading a grain bin was trapped for nearly five hours when his foot became caught under the side of a sweep auger motor and he was buried in grain above his waist. Courtesy of the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service, this report illustrates how this type of incident could occur at other grain-handling facilities, and provides safety guidelines that could help other elevators avoid grain bin entrapment or react more positively.

Read the Full Case Study

© 2019 CHS Inc.