Justifying Variable Rate Cost

Variable Rate

 

On my drive to work this morning the temperature was 47 degrees, and I noticed more and more of the leaves on beans and of corn are beginning to mature, fall is coming fast. And as fall comes fast, so too does fall spreading of fertilizer and soil sampling. Variable rate spreading of fertilizer is one of the biggest misconceptions that I find growers have.

Many people believe that Variable rate spreading is way more expensive, calls for a lot more fertilizer, and has to be done forever once started. All of these misconception can be true, but all of them usually deem false to most growers. In an example today I will walk you through a 40 acre piece of land. Soil type is a loamy sand, and rotation is two years of corn followed by one year of soybeans. Tillage is done after the first year of corn. Otherwise it is run as no till. After sampling on 2.5 acre grids (to produce good data for variable rate spreading) we found potassium levels to vary from 38 – 118 ppm, with an average of 63 ppm. This large variance in levels is not uncommon in Wisconsin fields. For this particular field the grower shoots for 200 bushel on the first year of corn. This being said a flat rate recommendation would be for 200 lbs of Potash. Using flat rate spreading, the field would cost the grower $1,310. With the increase in cost for variable rate application and a 200 bushel yield goal, the cost for the field is $1,271, this decrease in cost can help justify the cost of sampling the field and still provides the needed fertilizer for all the plants in the field. The application prescription varies from 121 lbs- 219 lbs of product with an average amount of 177 lbs. This use of variable rate spreading will be utilized until the levels of potassium in the field reach an equilibrium allowing us to return to flat rate spreading.

As we move closer to fall harvest keep this bit of information in mind, and if you may be interested in variable rate spreading and soil sampling feel free to contact your local agronomist or YieldPoint Specialist. If you would like to receive more information on this price comparison and the data behind it, feel free to contact me.

By: Alex Yost, YieldPoint Program Specialist

Improving Plant Nutrition: Understanding Nutrient Effectiveness

Center Valley Facility ResponsibleAg Certified

ResponsibleAg Certification Group

CHS Larsen Cooperative’s Center Valley location was honored to receive their ResponsibleAg Certification. This certification recognizes the commitment this facility has made to the safety and security of employees, customers and community.

ResponsibleAg is the only program in the nation that provides a comprehensive assessment of retailers and wholesalers to achieve and maintain federal regulatory compliance. Certification requires a facility to meet stringent regulatory-based criteria, to implement industry leading safety and security measures, and to resolve the facility safety as their highest priority.

All of the Center Valley employees participated in the corrective actions necessary to meet the requirements for this certification. Most actions were safety related items, as well as, proper identification with labels, proper waste management and communication.

CHS Larsen Cooperative is proud to be a part of this voluntary program that is a proactive commitment to providing a safe, secure and complaint workplace for their employees, customers and neighbors.

“Having the ResponsibleAg Certification will help us show the community around us that this is a safe place for the neighborhood and employees,” said Andy VanDyck, CHS Larsen Co-op Operations Manager. “We want to ensure those living in our community feel safe knowing that our business is compliant.”

To learn more about the ResponsbileAg program check out their website www.responsibleag.org

Pictured above are the Center Valley employees that helped make this certification possible. Left to Right: Jeremy Hunt, Taylor Coy, Jeff Beresford, Dave Barth, Paul Tank, Andy “Dutch” VanDyck, John Andraschko, Clay Alexander, and Tom Rose. Not Pictured: Hailey Sorenson and Mary Kay Cleven.

 

Hagie: Fungicide & Fertilizer in One Pass!

CHS Larsen Cooperative is very excited about our new Hagie STS 16. This new sprayer gives us the opportunity to apply both fungicide and fertilizer with our 360 Y-Drop system in the same pass. This machine has two separate tanks. This allows us to have both products loaded and spraying at once. This not only saves you time and money. You are also adding your nitrogen at the V8-V10 range as well as your fungicide protection with the undercover all in one pass. This also allows us to cover more acres with this new dual tank set-up.

We are excited to bring this Hagie into Wisconsin, as it is the only machine with these capabilities. CHS Larsen Cooperative is proud to offer our patrons this unique service of applying fungicide and fertilizer in one pass. This machine will have 360 Y-drops mounted on the first 70-72 feet of the 120 foot boom to be able to apply late season nitrogen and undercover.

More about the Hagie STS 16

The 1,600 gallon solution capacity sprayer features 76 inches of under-frame clearance in a lightweight and balanced design. This widens the application window to perform timely and precise full season applications. Application equipment users maximize efficiencies with front mounted boom visibility from the spacious application-specific cab. This is designed specifically with operator safety and ergonomics in mind. Experience minimal crop damage with the narrow leg design and crop package, while enhanced capability for various tire options and attachment capability makes the STS a one machine solution for every application need.

This sprayer features a 9.0 liter John Deere PowerTech™ PSS engine rated at 375 horsepower, with a 413 horsepower bulge. This is the newest Final Tier 4 compliant sprayer model.

Hagie Front View

2017 Alfalfa Considerations

Standing AlfalfaThe fall and winter of 2016, along with the spring of 2017, has surely wreaked havoc throughout our trade territory in regards to the alfalfa crop.  As agronomists, we are noticing some areas nearly untouched from winter-kill. While other fields are virtually a total loss.  Some older stands are weakened to the point that they will not provide ample feed for this year. They likely would be better off to rotated to corn.  CHS Larsen Cooperative still has an ample supply of alfalfa seed, both conventional and Roundup Ready®, along with oats for cover crop.  As the calendar pushed later, alternatives such as sorghum and sudan mixes may come into consideration.  Please talk to your agronomist about seed supply today.

If this spring doesn’t allow us time for seeding alfalfa, keep in mind that fall (August 1-15th) is another great time to get alfalfa established for the following year.  Remember to have your field soil tested. You will need to have an adequate pH before trying to establish alfalfa.

Healthy Crop

Those that have alfalfa, I still urge you to keep up your fertility program with Aspire® (Potash + Boron) and a sulfur source.  Recent years have offered us ample supplies of alfalfa. However, some may be looking to buy alfalfa due to the winter-kill.

Click here to read about some pricing considerations for standing crop from Greg Blonde, UW-Extension.

by Lisa Busse, CCA, Sales Agronomist

Case Trident has Arrived

Case Trident
 In mid-April, we received our brand new Case Trident Patriot® Spreader.

This is one of six Case Trident’s made this year as test run for Case. They are using our machine to pull data to fine tune this model for final production. We are one of two cooperatives in Wisconsin with this machine. The technology on this machine is a brand new design.

This will allow us the opportunity to apply two dry products at one time. It has technology on the box that will slow down the spinner on the edge of the field, so this will allow us to keep more product in the field, giving us more precise control of application. This also has a unique air suspension shock system which gives better control in the field and better precision in applying. It also has true 4-wheel drive.

CHS Larsen Co-op Employee Randy Weyland is the designated operator of this new machine. Ed Danke, Jeff Buttles, and Andy Colrue will be potentially also run this machine when needed.

By Scott Jones, Agronomy Department Manager

 

The 4 R’s For Nitrogen Management and Corn Production in Wisconsin

By Alex Yost, YieldPoint™ Program Specialist

Recently the Agri-View newspaper published an insert of UW Discovery farms research in Buffalo County, this Insert sparked my interest as I read about the sustainability techniques and cropping system that the grower utilized to minimize field runoff and maximize his production. The article partially touches on nitrogen use, but emphasizes the use of the 4 R’s of sustainability, the right source, the right rate, right timing, and the right placement. All of these techniques can lead to increased yields and sometimes decreased costs on farms across the state. Managing the 4 R’s can be a headache for your operation if not assisted by the professional minds of CHS Larsen Cooperative.

Starting with the right source, CHS Larsen Cooperative offers an assortment of types of nitrogen fertilizer, talking with your agronomist and YieldPoint™ representative can help find you the right source of nitrogen to best suit your cropping system.

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CHS YieldPoint High Efficiency Farming Seminar March 7th

CHS Larsen Cooperative is hosting a High Efficiency Farming Seminar on Tuesday, March 7, 2017. All are invited to come and get answers to your crop planning, while exploring the latest technologies available to maximize crop production success!

There will be a full house of new and updated equipment on display. The seminar will include presentations from the nations leading precision Ag Companies, including: Precision Planting, 360 Yield Center, Crop IMS/Ag Leader, Meridian, Yetter, and Harvest International.

You also have the opportunity to win some great door prizes! We will be giving away an Ag Leader Compass Display, Craftsman Tool Sets, and Soil Scan program certificates.

Doors open at 9 a.m. Tuesday, March 7, 2017; Meeting 9:15 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

RSVP to Ryan Jones at 920-410-0649.

The full line up of speakers are as follows:

“The Planter of Tomorrow is in Your Shed Today” – Mike Schlitt, Precision Planting
“A Planter Designed for Precision” – Dustin Friesen, Harvest International
“Unlocking Your Full Yield Potential” – Aaron Phillips, 360 Yield Center
“Work Smarter Not Harder” – Andy Briggs, Crop IMS / Ag Leader
“Profitable Solutions for Production Ag.” -Tyler Thomas, Yetter
“Innovators of Seed Handling” – Lewis Wenell, Meridian

Bring canned goods for Harvest for Hunger and you’ll receive an additional raffle ticket! 

 

More Choices to Control Broadleaf Weeds

by Matt McKown, Agronomy Sales Manager

With the EPA’s approval of the low volatility dicamba products, farmers now have more choices for the control of broadleaf weeds such as palmer amaranth, waterhemp, marestail as well as tough to control lambsquarter and velvetleaf. By combining innovative trait technologies and herbicide options this will help maximize weed control and increase yield potential. This allows us to utilize dicamba and glyphosate for pre-planting and an in-crop option RoundUp Ready 2 Xtend® soybeans.

With this approval there are some standard restrictions such as:

  • It may not be applied by aircraft
  • It may not be applied in winds over 15mph
  • It can only be applied by specific nozzles at specific rates
  • It must have a within-field buffer of 110 to 220 feet depending on application rate

We also need to be very mindful of specialty crops and other plant life that could be damaged from the use of the dicamba products. The EPA requires very specific and rigorous drift mitigation measures for the use of these products. Always make sure to fully read the label before use. Give your CHS agronomist a call to learn more about dicamba products and the RoundUp Ready 2 Xtend® soybeans for the 2017 planting season.

Root Lesion Nematode Management in Wisconsin

By Alex Yost, YieldPoint Program Specialist

Deep below the snow and ice covering our fields this winter lives a pest commonly overlooked in agronomic management. The root lesion nematode (RLN) is a pest of over 400 crops and plants native to Wisconsin. The management issue with root lesion nematodes is the damage caused. The damage of a root lesion nematode is primarily diagnosed as being fungal or bacterial rots when seen on crops in season. RLN is a parasitic nematode meaning that it cannot kill it’s host plant or it will die itself. This means the nematode feeds on root cells, and when the cell dies it moves to the next, and so forth. Each wound caused by the feeding is then infected with rots and bacteria after the nematodes move on. In extreme cases damage can equate to death of the plant and field conditions similar to in the picture. Death to plants specifically correlated to nematode feeding is rare on crops after seedling stage, but yield penalties do occur further in the growing season.

At a recent conference in Madison I had the privilege to sit in on a presentation from Dr. Ann MacGuidwin, the nematode specialist for the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She spoke of the severity of RLN and other nematodes in Wisconsin fields, (needle nematodes, root knot nematodes, and soybean cyst nematodes). For the University of Madison 90% of all nematode tests that came in to the lab contained some number of RLN leading to further research into the severity on agronomic crops. Dr. MacGuidwin stated there was minimal data producing a threshold for treatment of RLN in-season but sufficient data can be drawn on pre-plant nematode testing in Wisconsin due to our winters reducing populations to a static number of nematodes in the soil. Contact your agronomist or myself for further information on nematode management, or if you feel like you have a nematode problem in your fields.

© 2019 CHS Inc.