Shop Safety Tips

The hazards associated with shop work require special safety considerations. Whether you work in a metal shop, wood shop, automotive shop, glass shop, or electrical shop, the potential hazards for personal injury are numerous. Below are key reminders to keep yourself and your coworkers safe when working in a shop or performing preventative maintenance.

  • Do not wear loose or torn clothing, neckties, or jewelry when working around machinery.
  • Wear clothes that are suitable for the work you are doing. If you wear a long sleeved shirt, be sure the sleeves are rolled down and buttoned.
  • Make certain that long hair is not loose and is pulled back away from equipment.
  • Be certain all safety guards are in place before operating any machine or equipment.
  • Turn off, de-energize/unplug, or lock out (depending on the type of equipment) all equipment before cleaning, repairing or adjusting. This includes trucks and cars when working in or under them.

Wear safety glasses with side shields when working with shop equipment. Additional protection using face shields with safety glasses or goggles are necessary for the following types of work:

  • Grinding, chipping, sandblasting
    Welding

Wear suitable gloves, preferably leather, when working with the following:

  • Scrap metal or wood
  • Sharp-edged stock
  • Unfinished lumber

CHS Larsen Cooperative Awards 18 $1,000 Scholarships

CHS Larsen Cooperative is proud to announce that they have awarded $18,000 in scholarships. This is the nineteenth year they have offered a scholarship program for their customers; already helping over 277 students. CHS Larsen Cooperative’s trade territory has expanded and they have felt the need to return support to the communities that help support their cooperative.

CHS Larsen Cooperative offered this scholarship to graduating high school seniors and currently enrolled post high school education. The 18 students that received the 2019 scholarship are as follows: Collin Baehnman of Weyauwega, parent Tim Baehnman; Tomi Bestul of Waupaca, parents are Tom and Connie Bestul; Justin Engebretsen of Gillett, parents are Jeff and Cindy Engebretsen; Leah Grundman of Winneconne, parents are Robert and Michelle Grundman; Hunter Havrilla of Omro, parent Richard Potratz; Caitlyn Henry attending Bellin College, parents are Jonathan and Cheryl Henry; Melissa Hofacker of Freedom, parents are John and Lynn Hofacker; Jacob Kafer of Omro, parents are Pat and Stacy Kafer; Garret Karweick of Seymour, parents are Jill and Vernon Karweick; Zachary Le Mahieu of Pestigo, parents are Keith and Jean Le Mahieu; Jessica Magdanz of Weyauwega/Fremont, parents are Dan and Medora Magdanz; Logan Meyer of Antigo, parents are Eric and Kristin Meyer; Sara Nehring of Weyauwega/Fremont, parents are Dan and Jennifer Nehring; Paige Proctor of Stevens Point, parents are Anne and John Proctor; Ellen Sohrweide of Oconto, parents are Brian and Tracey Sohrweide; Olivia Tews of New London, parents are Todd and Lois Tews; Ashely Van Dyck attending UW-Stout, parents Andy and Laurie Van Dyck and Markie Verhasselt of Freedom, parents are Bruce and Vicky Verhasselt.

The criteria and 2020 application are on their website CHSLarsenCooperative.com. The deadline for the CHS Larsen Cooperative scholarship is March 15, 2020. Visit their website to apply for next year or call 1-800-924-6677.

CHS Larsen Cooperative is proud to support our local youth. It pays to invest in our local future industry leaders.

CHS Larsen Co-op fights rural hunger through March campaign

Working together with CHS locations across the country, employees, community organizations and businesses, and farmers of CHS Larsen Cooperative joined the fight against rural hunger through the cooperative’s annual CHS Harvest for Hunger food, and funds drive. The annual campaign gathered more than $500,000 and 94,959 pounds of food to fight hunger in rural America. Locally, CHS Larsen Cooperative raised $4,946 and 3,000 pounds of food for local food shelves.

Since 2011, CHS Country Operations, a division of CHS, the nation’s leading farmer-owned cooperative, has organized the campaign to gather money and food for local and regional food shelves across the country. With this year’s total, the cooperative has now raised more than $6 million and 4.5 million pounds of food in the nine years since the campaign was first launched.

CHS Larsen Cooeprative participated in the 2019 Harvest for Hunger drive held March 1-20 through a variety of fundraising activities, including teaming up with four school disticts (New London, Winneconne, Freedom and Weyauwega-Fremont) to raise food and funds. CHS Larsen Cooperative wanted to make a larger impact in the communities which receive the donations. By teaming up with the schools it turned out to be very successful. All the food raised in each school district went to their local food pantry. All pantries received over 400 pounds of food each!

“Often, local food shelves and food pantries are doing invisible work. They are feeding people in our rural communities who we would never imagine are going hungry,” says Todd Reif, “That’s why it’s so important that we support these local organizations. We are in the business of feeding the world, but we may never realize who is facing hunger right in our own communities. But these organizations have the system and contacts in place to make sure everyone has food on the table every day.”

Join CHS Larsen Cooperative to help fight hunger through CHS Harvest for Hunger

CHS Larsen Cooperative is gathering donations of money and food to help fight hunger. As part of CHS Harvest for Hunger food and fund drive, CHS Larsen Cooperative will accept contributions from March 1 through March 20 at its locations in New London, Readfield, Center Valley, Weyauwega, Larsen, and Oconto Falls; they will then deliver all collections to the local food pantries.

“Hunger is a reality for more than 40 million people in America, including 13.1 million children. Every dollar we raise through CHS Harvest for Hunger can purchase six pounds of food through our food banks,” says Todd Reif, general manager, CHS Larsen Cooperative. “That’s making a real difference for those in need.”

Financial donations are encouraged because they enable food banks to leverage their buying power to provide nutritious food at deeply discounted rates. In 2018, CHS Larsen Cooperative raised $2,600 and over 580 pounds of food. This all stayed in the communities in which they reside.

“Our local communities also win when CHS Country Operations makes a contribution to help friends and neighbors right here in our community. Fighting hunger in our communities’ ties directly to what farmers and ranchers do every day, raising crops and livestock to feed the world,” adds Reif.

Donations can be made at CHS Larsen Cooperative’s locations in New London, Readfield, Center Valley, Weyauwega, Larsen and Oconto Falls. If you would like to donate to this cause but are unable to drop it off at one of our locations, please contact Anne Moore at our main office 920-982-1111 and she will send someone out to pick up the donation. Or you may mail a check to CHS Larsen Cooperative Attn: Harvest for Hunger P.O. Box 308 New London WI, 54961 or call 920-982-1111 for more information on how you can help.

For more information go to our community tab.

CHS Larsen Cooperative New London Office Upgrades to LED Lighting

Before and after of the front warehouse. 

CHS Larsen Cooperative recently completed an interior and exterior lighting upgrade to LED lighting at their New London main office. After learning about the Focus on Energy rebates from Jeremy Bellile, owner of BNH Lighting, LLC, they worked together to get everything in the offices, warehouse and parking lot converted over to LED technology. This will save the cooperative thousands of dollars each year on their electric bill.

CHS Larsen Cooperative received a rebate from Focus on Energy that covered half the cost of the project. After the rebate and the savings on maintenance costs, the conversion will pay for itself in approximately 1.5 years. They are proud to work with Focus on Energy, which partners with New London Utilities, to help businesses reduce energy waste.

 “Working with BNH Lighting, LLC, was great from designing the new LED solution and maximizing the Focus on Energy incentives,to the installment of the lights,” said Randy Marx, New London location manager.The install went quick working with Nass Electric, a local electrical contractor.Jeremy was thorough with the LED solution, paperwork for Focus on Energy,organizing the installation and quick to follow up with the completion. “We are excited about our new lighting and the savings to come.” 

CHS Larsen Cooperative, a full-service ag retailer, is part of CHS Inc., a leading energy, grains and foods global agribusiness owned by farmers, ranchers and cooperatives across the United States. Diversified in energy, grains and foods, CHS is committed to helping its customers,farmer-owners and other stakeholders grow their businesses through its domestic and global operations.

Before and after of the farm store. 

CHS Larsen Cooperative Supports Hometown Fire Department

Pictured: Todd Reif, CHS Larsen Co-op General Manager and Loren Steinacker, local farmer and fire fighter. 

CHS Larsen Cooperative awarded a $2,250 grant to Hortonville-Hortonia Fire District. The funds will help to keep their equipment up to date and their firefighters certified. Some of the equipment they are looking to purchase will aid in rescue situations if there were an active shooter incident. As a department they interact with several different local agencies and the school district, helping teach kids what to do if such a situation would arise.

“We’re proud to support this project as a way to strengthen the community and see it thrive,” says Todd Reif, General Manager, CHS Larsen Cooperative. “Projects like this are essential to enriching our rural area and the people who live here.”

In addition to the funds contributed by CHS Larsen Cooperative, the contribution has been matched dollar for dollar by a CHS Seeds for Stewardship grant, which helps cooperatives grow their impact locally. Together more than $4,500 will benefit Hortonville-Hortonia Fire District.

“Cooperatives were founded on the principles of education, community involvement and cooperation,” says Todd Reif. “By combining resources, we are providing double the impact to our area and demonstrating the cooperative spirit.”

To learn more about other ways CHS Larsen Cooperative gives back, visit https://www.chslarsencooperative.com/community/

Road Safety During Harvest

Road safety is especially important as farmers and motorists share the road during harvest season. As Corn Silage has started in most areas we are encouraging all to be safe this harvest season.

Harvest season generally brings a time when there is an increase in collisions between farm equipment and other vehicles. Vehicle collisions are often the result of the speed differential between slower-moving farm equipment and passenger cars and trucks. Many times passenger vehicle drivers simply don’t have enough time to react if they do not recognize the farm equipment soon enough.

For Farmers

Farmers can take steps to enhance farm machinery visibility.  Before traveling on public roads remember to:

  • Lock brake pedals.
  • Adjust mirrors for good vision.
  • Make sure that all warning flashers, lights, and slow moving vehicle (SMV) emblems are in proper operating condition, clean, and easily visible. If they are covered with dust, wipe them off before leaving the field.
  • Check tire inflation pressures. Inflate the tires to the maximum recommended pressure for long-distance travel.

 

When traveling on public roads:

  • Watch for potholes or obstacles that could tip the tractor.
  • Listen for cars. Often vehicles will rapidly approach from the rear at three to four times the speed of the tractor.
  • Stay alert at all times to avoid a serious accident. Do not use the cell phone or two-way radio while operating equipment on public roads.
  • Keep a constant lookout for pedestrians, animals, mailboxes, steep ditch embankments and other roadway obstacles.
  • Slow down for sharp curves or when going down a hill.
  • Consider using an escort vehicle to follow behind.
  • Be cognizant of high traffic times, usually mornings and late afternoons. While it often is impossible to avoid operating on the roads during these times, it may be possible to limit road transportation.

 

Other safety recommendations include:

  • Place the SMV sign, mounted point up, on the vehicle two to six feet above the ground and as near to the rear center as possible.

 

  • Make sure the tractor has the following lighting and signage:
    • two headlights;
    • at least one tail lamp, mounted on the left side facing the rear of the tractor;
    • at least two amber warning lights, visible from front and rear, mounted at the same level at least 42 inches above ground level;
    • at least two red reflectors, visible from the rear and mounted on either side;
    • amber warning extremity lights, visible from front and rear, mounted over dual- or triple-wheeled vehicles;
    • and the Speed Identification Symbol (SIS) on high-speed tractors and equipment.

 

For Motorists

Keep in mind the following safety tips for motorists as you share the road with farm equipment:

  • Farm machinery has a legal right to use public roads just as other motor vehicles.
  • Farm machinery can unexpectedly turn onto a public road from a field or driveway. Farm machinery travels slower than normal traffic, often at speeds of 25 miles per hour or less. Automobile drivers must quickly identify farm equipment and slow down immediately to avoid rear-end crashes.
  • Farm machinery operators may not be able to see you because the large equipment or a load can block part of their rear view. If you can’t see the driver, the driver can’t see you.
  • Slow-moving farm machinery traveling less than 25 miles per hour should display a slow moving vehicle emblem on the back of the equipment. This is a quickly identifiable sign to other motorists.
  • Machinery that is half on the road and half on the shoulder may suddenly move completely onto the road.
  • Extra-wide farm machinery may take up more than one lane to avoid hitting obstacles such as mailboxes and road signs.

 

Before passing farm machinery:

  • Check to be sure the machinery is not turning left. Look for left turn lights or hand signals. If the machinery slows and pulls toward the right side of the road, the operator is likely preparing to make a wide left turn. Likewise, sometimes to make a right turn with wide equipment, the driver must fade to the left.
  • Determine if the road is wide enough for you and the machinery to safely share.
  • Look for roadside obstacles such as mailboxes, bridges, or road signs that may cause the machinery to move to the center of the road.
  • Be sure there is adequate distance for you to safely pass.

 

Rural road rage can be negated if everyone takes the responsibility to have extra patience, careful driving habits, and use high-visibility markings and lighting.

 

This article originally appeared in OSU Extension News (10/09/08).

Awards 13 $1,000 Scholarships

CHS Larsen Cooperative is proud to announce that they have awarded $13,000 in scholarships. This is the eighteenth year they have offered a scholarship program for their customers; already helping over 264 students. CHS Larsen Cooperative’s trade territory has expanded and they have felt the need to return support to the communities that help support their cooperative.

$1,000 Scholarship Winners

CHS Larsen Cooperative offered this scholarship to graduating high school seniors and currently enrolled post high school education. The 13 students that received the 2018 scholarship are as follows: Bailey Adams of Stevens Point, parents are Larry and Lisa Adams; Jenna Breitenfeldt of Wausau East, parents are Wayne and Lori Breitenfeldt; Jason Ebert of Clintonville, parents Tim and Crystal Ebert; Madeline Egan of Omro, parents are John and Sheri Egan; Paige Hein of Seymour, parents are Joe and Beth Hein; Kelsey Potratz of Omro, parents Wes and Lorie Potratz; Sarah Rohm of Seymour, parents are Keith and Paula Rohm; Megan Schuh of Freedom, parents are Brent and Carrie Schuh; Zachary Sievert of Pulaski, parents are Rod and Ann Sievert; Brett Van Dyck of Appleton, parent Andy and Laurie Van Dyck; Matt Verhasselt of Freedom, parents are Mike and Marney Verhasselt; Jacob Viergutz of Clintonville, parents are David and Connie Viergutz, and Colin Wussow of Bonduel, parents are Ron and Nicolle Wussow.

Apply for 2019 Scholarships Today

The criteria and 2019 application is on the website CHSLarsenCooperative.com. The deadline for the CHS Larsen Cooperative scholarship is March 15, 2019. Visit the website to apply for next year or call 1-800-924-6677.

CHS Larsen Cooperative is proud to support our local youth. It pays to invest in our local future industry leaders.

CHS Larsen Co-op joins the fight against rural hunger

Shana Shepard, Energy Customer Service Rep, delivered to the New London Community Cupboard, Kim Ebert.

CHS Larsen Cooperative joined CHS locations across the country in fighting rural hunger with the cooperative’s annual CHS Harvest for Hunger food, funds and grain drive. The annual campaign gathered more than $540,000 and 215,000 pounds of food to fight hunger in rural America.

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Join CHS Larsen Cooperative to help fight hunger through CHS Harvest for Hunger 2018

New London, WISC., February 26, 2018 – CHS Larsen Cooperative is gathering donations of money, food and crops to help fight hunger. As part of CHS Harvest for Hunger food and fund drive, CHS Larsen Cooperative will accept contributions from March 1 through March 20 at its locations in New London, Readfield, Center Valley, Weyauwega, Larsen, and Oconto Falls; they will then deliver all collections to our local food pantries.

“Hunger is a reality for more than 40 million people in America, including 13.1 million children. Every dollar we raise through CHS Harvest for Hunger can purchase six pounds of food through our food banks,” says Todd Reif, general manager, CHS Larsen Cooperative. “That’s making a real difference for those in need.”

Financial donations are encouraged because they enable food banks to leverage their buying power to provide nutritious food at deeply discounted rates. In 2017, CHS Larsen Cooperative raised $4,208 and over 5,028 pounds of food which their parent company, CHS, added bonus dollars to bring the 2017 total to $10,092. This all stayed in the communities in which we reside.

“Our local communities also win when CHS Country Operations makes a contribution to help friends and neighbors right here in our community. Fighting hunger in our communities’ ties directly to what farmers and ranchers do every day, raising crops and livestock to feed the world,” adds Reif.

Donations can be made at CHS Larsen Cooperative’s locations in New London, Readfield, Center Valley, Weyauwega, Larsen and Oconto Falls. If you would like to donate to this cause but are unable to drop it off at one of our locations please contact Anne Moore at our main office 920-982-1111 and she will send someone out to pick up the donation. Or you may mail a check to CHS Larsen Cooperative Attn: Harvest for Hunger P.O. Box 308 New London WI, 54961 or call 920-982-1111 for more information on how you can help.

© 2019 CHS Inc.